• Heat Design - Specialists in Stove Parts for 40 years - CE Approved

Stove Parts Terminology

Stove Glass

Stove Glass

There is a large glass window on Heat Design stoves to ensure that the flames can be
viewed well. The airwash system keeps the glass clean. The glass is heat
resistant and durable, and will not crack even if the stove is over-fired (i.e.
heated to too high a temperature). The glass can be cleaned with a glass
cleaner – abrasive cleaners should not be used as they will scratch the glass,
and this will make it more difficult to clean the next time. Although the glass
will not crack from heat, it will crack if inappropriate fuels are burned, e.g.
domestic plastic sticking to the glass can damage it, as can burning wet logs
in an already hot stove.

Replacing the glass on your stove is relatively simple. Always wear
safety gloves when handling glass to protect against injury. Once the damaged
glass has been removed, thoroughly clean the area to remove dirt and dust that
may have built up over time before fitting with the new stove glass.

Ashpan

Ashpan

The Ashpan is below the grate, and collects the ash falling through from the burnt fuel.
It must be emptied regularly, as ash building up to the grate can cause
distortion or burning out of the grate bars. A wood fire burns better on a bed
of ash, so if the customer is intending to only burn wood, it will not need to
be emptied as often, but will still need to be emptied so that it does not
impede airflow around the stove.

Back and Side Plates

Back Plates

The back and side plates, also known as Back Bricks and Side Bricks of a
stove are the plates that protect the main body of the stove from damage and
prolong its life.

Baffle Plate

Baffle Plate

A Baffle Plate, also known as a Top Plate or Throat Plate is a metal plate that
sits inside the stove over the firebox. This plate blocks off the direct exit
to the chimney which means that the hot flue gases have to travel further
before they get out of the stove. This means that there is more time for the flue
gases to be mixed with air and fully combust in the firebox and more heat can
be transferred from the firebox to the stove and/or water in the boiler. This
makes the stove more efficient, and increases its heat output. It also has a
protective function, keeping heat from directly impacting the inside of the
stove.

Once a month, when the stove is cold, the baffle needs to be removed and cleaned to
remove ash and soot. Removing the baffle also allows access so the chimney or
flueway can be swept through the stove. Both the chimney and the flue need to
be swept at least once a year.
Exposure to extreme heat
deteriorates baffle plates, requiring them to be removed and replaced
periodically.

Coal Catcher

Coal Catcher

The Coal Catcher, also known as a Fire Fence, Front Guard and Log Retainer is the grill at the
front of your stove. This is positioned just inside your stove to prevent coal
and other burning materials from falling out of the stove. This is a consumable
item that may need replacing due to general wear and tear over time.

Collar

Collar

A stove collar is fixed onto the back or top of the stove. It is the starting point of the flue and on rare occasions can become cracked. 

In order to maximise the number of ways a Heat Design stove can be installed, they come with both top and rear flue options – whichever of these is in use will need to have the collar fitted, and whichever is not in use will have the blanking plate fitted. The collar is used to make a clean, sealable connection between the stove pipe and the flue pipe.

Inner Bricks / Plates

Inner Bricks / Plates

Vermiculite or cast iron inner plates are found in the firebox of a stove and protect the insides of the stove from the intense heat of the fire. Vermiculite is a light highly insulating material, and both types of inner plate protect the inside of the stove and also increases the temperature in the firebox thus increasing efficiency.

Riddle Grate

Riddle Grate

The Riddle Grate, also known as the Round Grate or Centre Grate allows the ash and
cinders from smokeless fuels, anthracite or peat/turf briquettes to be riddled
into an ashpan below, maintaining the primary airflow through the fuel bed and,
hence, creating the optimum conditions for efficient combustion of those particular
fuels.

Grate for Riddle Grate

Grate for Riddle Grate

The Riddle Grate sits into the centre of the Bottom Grate.  This allows you to grate the stove from the
outside. Most stoves have a riddle bar fitted to shake the grate from side to
side and up and down.  When you shake the
riddle grate, the ash and cinders drop from the firebox and into the ash pan.

Prolonged exposure to hot ash will damage the bard of the riddling grate
therefore this often needs replacing due to general wear and tear over time.

Rope Seal

Rope Seal

All stoves require some type of seal on the door and/or glass to make the stove airtight allowing it to burn at its optimum level.  The glass fibre rope smoke seal around a stove door seals the door to the stove so that the only air getting into the stove comes through the air inlets and not through the joints between the door and the body of the stove. This makes the stove much more controllable and more efficient. The rope is made of a woven fibreglass material and is soft easily handled.

Over time rope seals often need replacing due to deterioration (frayed, split or coming away from the door). When this happens, the efficiency of your stove may be affected, and the lack of control could also lead to over-firing and the over-heating of some of the stove components, which in turn can damage other stove parts.

Primary Air Control

The Primary Air source for the stove is controlled using the sliders or spin dials at bottom of the door – the term Primary Air refers to the normal draught of air to the fire bed, used to start the fire. The direction of the sliders are marked with + and – signs or open and closed. Wood typically burns best with the Primary Air source closed, and using the Secondary or Airwash controls to control the burn rate.

Secondary Air Control (Airwash)

The Secondary Air Controls are at the top of the stove door.  This airwash flows down the front of the glass, keeping it clean, and allowing the flame to be always on view. The air then rises back into the combustion box which allows the fuel to burn for longer, and therefore both more efficiently, and more cleanly. Introducing pre-heated, secondary air into the firebox at just the right point promotes efficient combustion of any unburnt hydrocarbons which may be in the smoke. This ‘cleanburn’ process can greatly increase the combustion efficiency of the stove and dramatically reduce the amount of unburnt particles going up the chimney.

Sign Up